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4011 Big Led Display Number - (7,486 view(s))

Saturday, September 29th, 2012
4011 Led Display Number electrosuite.com

ElectroSuite.com – 4011 Big Led Display Number. It counts from 0 to 9 at a potentiometer adjustable speed. The CMOS ICS used were a 4011B Quad 2-input NAND gate, a 4518B dual BCD up counter, and a 4511B BCD to 7 segment decoder/driver.

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4013B CMOS Dual D Flip Flop - (6,578 view(s))

Thursday, July 19th, 2012
4013B CMOS Dual D Flip Flop - ElectroSuite

ElectroSuite.com – 4013B CMOS Dual D Flip Flop. It’s simply a cmos 4013 configured to divide by 2.

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12VDC 220VAC 100W Mosfet Inverter - (24,719 view(s))

Friday, August 5th, 2011
12VDC 220VAC 100W Mosfet Inverter

12VDC 220VAC 100W Mosfet Inverter

This is 12VDC 220VAC 100W Mosfet Inverter Electro Suite, can invert the voltage from 12 Volt DC into 220 Volt AC with the power of 100 Watt.

Using the MOSFET as the amplifier and the heart of this circuit is IC CD4047 as function of Multivibrator Astable. The Frequency can be modified by VR1, the multivibrator output of CD4047 as the complement squarewave for the driver of MOSFET T1 and T2.

Transformator with the current of 2 until 3 Ampere, with the primary coil of 0V and 220V as the output and the secondary coil 12V CT as the input that driven by MOSFET T1 and T2.

Components

  • C1 = 2200μ / 25V
  • C2 = 0,01μ
  • C3 = 0,1μ / 600V
  • C4 = 2,2μ / 400V
  • VR1 = 100 KΩ
  • R2 = 390 KΩ
  • R3 = 330 Ω
  • R4 = 820 Ω
  • R5, R6 = 220 Ω
  • S2 = SPST Switch
  • T1, T2 = IRF540
  • MOV RDN = MOV RDN240/20
  • B1 = Battery (6×2) V, 4Ah
  • X2 = Transformator 2-3A
  • IC1 = CD4047
  • D5 = 1N4007
  • D7 = LED

Electro Suite

12VDC 220VAC 100W Mosfet Inverter

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Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047 - (3,577 view(s))

Friday, July 29th, 2011
Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047

Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047

This is Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047 electro suite, which can repell insects effectively, without disrupting the human hearing.

A CMOS 4047, consists of PLL (Phase Looked Loop) oscillator with the frequency of 22 Khz, and the current drain is around 120mA.

By placing the Motorola 3.25″ Piezo speaker inside or outside house, this Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047 can repell the insect, but remember to make it (speaker) safety from the rain.

Insect Repellent Suite using CMOS 4047

Source : circuitdiagram.net

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Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2 - (6,073 view(s))

Thursday, July 21st, 2011
Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2

Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2

This is Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2 Electro Suite, this IC 8021-2 produced by LSI CMOS Technology.

For Door bell application, this IC simulates the mechanical ding-dong sound, and it’s ideal for it.

Components

  • IC1 = IC 8021-2
  • S1 = Switch on/off
  • S2 = Push Switch
  • Battery = 3 Volt
  • R1 = 1K
  • C1 = 10µ/12v
  • T1 = BC548 or C8050
  • T2 = BC557 or C8550
  • LS1 = 4Ω/8Ω – 500MW

Electro Suite

8021-2 Pin Configuration

8021-2 Pin Configuration

 

 

Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2

Ding Dong Sound Effect using IC 8021-2

Source : alldatasheet.com

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Smoke Detector Alarm by IC RE46C140 - (1 view(s))

Friday, June 17th, 2011

Using the IC RE46C140 integrated circuit you can design smoke detector alarm using few external electronic components. The IC RE46C140 is a low power CMOS photoelectric type smoke detector IC that will provide all the required features for a photoelectric type smoke detector project .
This smoke detector alarm design incorporates a gain selectable photo amplifier for use with an infrared emitter detector pair.
An internal oscillator strobes power to the smoke detection circuitry for 100us every 10 seconds to keep standby current to a minimum. If smoke is sensed the detection rate is increased to verify an alarm condition.

An interconnect pin allows multiple detectors to be connected such that when one units alarms, all units will sound.
An internal 10 minute timer can be used for a reduced sensitivity mode. In standby the LED is pulsed on for 10mS every 43 seconds . In a local alarm condition or the push to test alarm the LED pulse frequency is increased to once every .5 seconds. In the case of a remote alarm the LED not active. In the timer mode of operation the LED is pulsed on for 10mS every 10 seconds.

A comparator compares the photo amp output to an internal reference voltage. If the required number of consecutive smoke conditions is met the device will go into local alarm and the horn will be active.
The bidirectional IO pin allows interconnection of multiple detectors. In a local alarm condition this pin is driven high immediately through a constant current source. Shorting this output to ground will not cause excessive current. The IO is ignored as an input during a local alarm.
This smoke detector circuit must be powered from a 9 volt DC power supply.

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Light Detector by IC CMOS 4001 - (1 view(s))

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

This is a circuit diagram of light detector. This circuit can be used as a sensor of automatic lamp switch, thic circuit also can be used for anti theft alarm circuit.

  • Variable resistor R1 : adjust the light threshold at which the circuit triggers.
  • R1 : to match the photocells resistance at darkness.
  • Uses a CMOS 4001 IC.
  • Gate U1a : The trigger, U1b and c form a latch.
  • S1 : Reset the circuit.

Use piezo buzzer or LED as output indicator,  or both of them

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Gate Alarm Circuit by IC CMOS 4093B - (1 view(s))

Friday, May 27th, 2011

  • by Rev Thomas Scarborough
  • IC1a is a fast oscillator, and IC1b a slow oscillator, which are combined through IC1c to emit a high pip-pip-pip warning sound when a gate (or window, etc.) is opened.
  • The circuit is intended not so much to sound like a siren or warning device, but rather to give the impression: “You have been noticed.”
  • R1 and D1 may be omitted, and the value of R2 perhaps reduced, to make the Gate Alarm sound more like a warning device.
  • VR1 adjusts the frequency of the sound emitted.
  • IC1d is a timer which causes the Gate Alarm to emit some 20 to 30 further pips after the gate has been closed again, before it falls silent, as if to say: “I’m more clever than a simple on-off device.”
  • Piezo disk S1 may be replaced with a LED if desired, the LED being wired in series with a 1K resistor.
  • Figure 2 shows how an ordinary reed switch may be converted to close (a “normally closed” switch) when the gate is opened.
  • A continuity tester makes the work easy.
  • Note that many reed switches are delicate, and therefore wires which are soldered to the reed switch should not be flexed at all near the switch.
  • Other types of switches, such as microswitches, may also be used.
via

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Car Alarm and Immobilizer - (1 view(s))

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Description:
This circuit features exit and entry delays, an instant alarm zone, an intermittent siren output and automatic reset. By adding external relays you can immobilize the vehicle and flash the lights.

Notes:
The alarm is “set” by opening Sw1. It can be any small 1-amp single-pole change-over switch – but for added security you could use a key-switch. Once Sw1 is opened you have about 10 to 15 seconds to get out of the vehicle and close the door behind you. When you return and open the door the buzzer will sound. You have 10 to 15 seconds to move Sw1 to the “off” position. If you fail to do so, the siren will sound. The output to the siren is intermittent – it switches on and off. The speed at which it switches on and off is set by C6 and R10. While any trigger-switch remains closed, the siren will continue to sound. About 2 to 3 minutes after all of the switches have been opened, the circuit will reset.

One of the inputs is connected to the vehicle’s existing door-switches. This provides the necessary exit and entry delays. It’s usually sufficient to connect a SINGLE wire to just ONE of the door switches – they’re generally all connected in parallel with the return through the chassis. You can add extra normally-open switches to the door-circuit if you wish; but note that any additional switches will have to be able to carry the current required by your vehicle’s interior light.

Any number of normally-open switches may be connected – in parallel – to the “Instant” input. Since they don’t have to carry the current for the interior light, you can use any type of switch you like. You may want an instant alarm on the bonnet, the boot, the rear-hatch, the rear-doors etc. It doesn’t matter if these already have switches connected to the door-circuit. Simply fit a second switch and connect it to the instant input. It will override the delay circuit. You can use the chassis for the return. However, a ground terminal is provided if – for any reason – you need to run a separate return wire for either zone. If you’re not using the instant zone then leave out Q2, R3, R4, R5 & D3.

The exit delay is set by R1 & C1, the entry delay by R9 & C4, and the reset time by R7 & C3. The precise length of any time period depends on the characteristics of the actual components used – especially the tolerance of the capacitors and the exact switching points of the Cmos Gates. However, for this type of application really accurate time periods are unnecessary.

The circuit board and switches must be protected from the elements. Dampness or condensation will cause malfunction. Fit a 1-amp in-line fuse AS CLOSE AS POSSIBLE to your power source. This is VERY IMPORTANT. The fuse is there to protect the wiring – not the alarm. Exactly how the system is fitted will depend on the make of your particular vehicle. Consequently, I CANNOT give any further advice on installation.

The circuit is designed to use an electronic Siren drawing 300 to 400mA. It’s not usually a good idea to use the vehicle’s own Horn because it can be easily located and disconnected. However, if you choose to use the Horn, remember that the alarm relay is too small to carry the necessary current. Connect the coil of a suitably rated relay to the “Siren” output. This can then be used to sound the Horn, flash the lights etc.

Add an Automatic Immobilizer.
Before fitting this immobilizer to your vehicle, carefully consider both the safety implications of its possible failure – and the legal consequences of installing a device that could cause an accident.

If YOU decide to proceed, you will need to use the highest standard of materials and workmanship. Remember that the relay MUST be large enough to handle the current required by your ignition system. Choose one specifically designed for automobiles – it will be protected against the elements and will give the best long-term reliability. You don’t want it to let you down on a cold wet night – or worse still – in fast moving traffic!!! Please note that I am UNABLE to help any further with either the choice of a suitable relay – or with advice on its installation.

When you turn-off the ignition, the relay will de-energize and the second set of contacts (RLA2) will break the ignition circuit – automatically immobilizing the vehicle. When the ignition is switched on again the relay will not energize; and the vehicle’s ignition circuit will remain broken. You must press Sw2 to energize the relay. It then latches itself on using the first set of contacts (RLA1); while the second set of contacts (RLA2) complete the connection to the ignition circuit.

The design has a number of advantages. It operates automatically when you turn the ignition off – so there’s no need to remember to activate it. The relay uses no current while the ignition is off – so there’s no drain on the battery. To de-activate it you’ll need to have the ignition key and you’ll need to know the whereabouts of the push-switch. Sw2 only requires a single wire because its return is through the chassis. It carries no load other than the current required by the relay-coil. So almost any small “momentary-action, push-to-make” switch will do. For extra security Sw2 could be key-operated.

The Support material for this alarm includes a step-by-step guide to the construction of the circuit-board, a parts list, and a detailed circuit description.

Source: www.zen22142.zen.co.uk

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